How the plus-size model from Britain breaks stereotypes

Not too long ago, models literally starved themselves to death to succeed in the industry. Thankfully, those times have largely passed, thanks to body-positive campaigns. But although plus-size models are increasingly common, they are still predominantly white. That’s what has made the 34-year-old Bishamber Das such a unique person. As the daughter of Indian parents, she hopes her success opens doors toward many others in South Asia looking to contribute to diversity in the fashion industry. The woman embraces a mixed identity and includes the heritage of her culture in a modeling career. However, Bishamber is not planning to make do with her looks only; Das has a university degree in law as well as she can speak 5 languages perfectly.

Trying to diversify the fashion world

It is not easy to be an Asian influencer at a time when most of the models are Caucasians. And so, how is Das handling the pressure to be the first plus-size Asian fashion star, so what are the accolades? She said in the interview that she likes doing what she does as it gives her the opportunity to disseminate positivity as well as fight against body shaming, especially where others are not acquainted with plus-size modeling. Here are two things she is particularly uncomfortable with. First, all the big famous brands declare that they accept the value of inclusivity with diversity, and yet the “proof” is just two or three black fashion girls that present the brand. Second, it seems they do not ever integrate South Asians into the campaigns, it proves the work still needs to be completed.
How the plus-size model from Britain breaks stereotypes

Face-to-face struggle

Das has also pointed out the adverse impact that an obsession with unattainable beauty norms was having on her private life. In the chants you listen to on the radio and in the media, the woman’s body is discussed in the context of the need for a big ass and a thin waist. All around the world commercials focus on blue eyes as well as light hair. Das explains that the importance attached to being very thin had affected her so negatively that it made her feel worthless and she might even consider suicide. Until recently, she didn’t talk about this struggle. She believes it’s essential to deal with these feelings to make sure that no one, whether they are younger or older, man or woman, big or otherwise, will not have to feel that there is nothing for them to do for society. And Das finds solace from the fact that the Asian society finally began to welcome her.
How the plus-size model from Britain breaks stereotypes

Changing the stereotypes

The model has already accomplished some outstanding results. Despite having no modeling experience, the beauty managed to achieve a runner-up result in the first-ever beauty contest when she represented Britain as a sole plus-size female and competed against other competitors from nine countries across Europe. It was a momentous moment for her. Bishamber unexpectedly gained a goal for her – to represent women who feel they have no voice. In particular, the model wants younger generations to ignore those who tell them what they should look like. The only important factor is how you feel about yourself!
How the plus-size model from Britain breaks stereotypes

Concentrate on your minds, body, and spirit

She’s not trying to claim she has answers for everything when talking about promoting a campaign of body positivity, but the model nonetheless knows that looking at her, other Asians know they too can make it in the modeling industry. Finding purpose in life begins with acceptance of who you are, and the presence of such individuals like our heroine shows that there is nothing that you will be cannot do. The things making a community beautiful ultimately depend on the positive energies that we have and the way we relate to others. Thus, if your dreams are to follow in her steps, do not only concentrate on getting a healthy physique but give as much attention to your spirit and mind as you do to your body.
How the plus-size model from Britain breaks stereotypes